Ghee is a type of clarified butter. It’s more concentrated in fat than butter, as its water and milk solids have been removed.

It has been used in Indian and Pakistani cultures for thousands of years. The term comes from the Sanskrit word meaning “sprinkled.” Ghee was created to prevent butter from spoiling during warm weather.

Ghee is free of potentially unhealthy additives, preservatives and trans fats. Thanks to its pure form and low moisture content, ghee is shelf-stable and can stay fresh for up to a year without refrigeration. While it's not an application for the general public, some families in India have aged ghee that has lasted more than 100 years.

The higher concentration of the nutrients in the ghee is due to its higher concentration of fat. A 2013 study determined that ghee isn't as harmful to heart health as it may appear. The author found that ghee contains short chain fatty acids that may help strengthen and develop cell membranes.

 

Typically if someone has a dairy intolerance, it is an intolerance to casein (a protein in milk) and lactose (the whey). Ghee contains neither. When prepared in the tradition of Ayurveda, the casein and lactose are removed, therefore making ghee tolerable for those who can't eat dairy otherwise.

Heat a little ghee and apply it on your body before bath for soft and smooth skin. If your face is dry, mix ghee with water and massage it into the skin. Wash after 15 minutes

Ghee is a good source of energy. If you consume pure home-made ghee on a regular basis, it will boost your mental as well as physical strength. This will help in keeping your body fit and fighting off illnesses. Besides this, ghee is also known as a body cleanser as it removes impurities from your body.